Serum C 10


1. The ultimate brightening serum with powerful antioxidants and essential nutrients.

2. 1% Ferulic Acid increases the stability of potent Vitamin C, derivative 10 % L-Ascorbic Acid to counter the effects of ageing and photo-damage.

3. It results in revealing a brighter, firmer, and more even looking complexion.

4. This advanced formula dissolves surface dead skin cells and replaces them with radiance and luminosity.

Uses of Serum C10

Brightening

Brightening

Brightening

Ingredients In serum c10

L-Ascorbic Acid

1. Antioxidant: neutralizes free radicals

2. Prevents changes associated with photoaging and promotes collagen synthesis

3. Lightens hyperpigmentation

Ferulic Acid

1. Free radical scavenger

2. Photoprotective agent, delayer of skin photoaging processes & inhibits melanogenesis

3. Stabilization of Vitamin C and synergistic action

Benifits of Serum c10



1. Promotes collagen synthesis

2. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory properties

3. Photoprotection from ultraviolet B and A

4. Lightens hyperpigmentation

5. Reduces post laser-resurfacing erythema

6. Improves acne and acne scarring

Need for Topical Vitamin C

Topical Vitamin C

1. Most plants and animals have the capacity to synthesize vitamin C. In humans, however, vitamin C cannot be synthesized because we have lost the ability to produce L-gulono--lactone oxidase, the enzyme necessary for its production.

2. Vitamin C must instead be obtained from dietary sources, such as citrus fruits and leafy green vegetables.

3. Oral supplementation with vitamin C does little to increase skin concentration because the absorption of vitamin C is limited by active transport mechanisms in the gut.

4. Therefore, topical application of vitamin C is the preferred method to increase its presence in the skin.

Effects of Vitamin C

Topical Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Topical Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Topical Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Topical Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Topical Vitamin C

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

All about Skin Aging

Skin Aging Defination

1. Skin aging is a complex process affected by both genetic and environmental factors, and it is largely influenced by the cumulative damage from exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

2. Chronic exposure of UV radiation on human skin leads to solar elastosis, degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and wrinkle formation.

3. Skin aging is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

4. Intrinsic or chronological skin aging results from the passage of time and is influenced by genetic factors.

5. Extrinsic skin aging mainly results from UV irradiation, which is called photoaging. These two types of aging processes are superimposed in sun-exposed skin

Changes in skin with age

1. As the skin ages, several changes occur in the epidermis and dermis.

2. In the epidermis, corneocytes (terminally differentiated keratinocytes) accumulate, giving the skin a rough and dull appearance.

3. In the dermis, the collagen content decreases, and collagen and elastin fibers become disorganized and fragmented.

4. This weakens the structure underlying the epidermis, leading to wrinkles.

Photoaging

What is Photoaging

The term “photoaging” was first coined in 1986 and describes distinct clinical, histological and functional features of chronically sun exposed skin.

Clinical signs of photoaging include dryness; irregular, dark/light pigmentation; sallowness; either deep furrows or severe atrophy; telangiectases; premalignant lesions; laxity; and a leathery appearance.

Other signs include elastosis (a course, yellow, cobblestoned effect of the skin) and actinic purpura (easy bruising related to vascular wall fragility in the dermis)

Mechanism of Photoaging

Acute ultraviolet irradiation leads to generation of ROS, upregulation of AP-1, and downregulation of TGF.

AP-1 leads to collagen breakdown, while decreased TGF-activity is associated with decreased collagen production.

No damage to the skin is repaired perfectly; acute solar damage leads to an invisible solar scar.

Repeated ultraviolet irradiation and injury eventually leads to accumulation of damage, eventually manifesting as a visible solar scar, or a wrinkle associated with photoaging.

Hyperpigmentaion

What is Hyper Pigmentation

1. Hyperpigmentation refers to patches of skin that become darker than the surrounding areas of skin.

2. It occurs when the skin produces excess melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color.

3. It can affect people of all skin types. It can:

occur in small patches

cover large areas

affect the entire body

Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation on Skin

Pathogenesis of Premature/Extrinsic Skin Aging

Ferulic Acid

About Flurid

Ferulic acid belongs to the phenolic acid group commonly found in plant tissues.

Ferulic acid is a free radical scavenger, but also an inhibitor of enzymes that catalyze free radical generation and an enhancer of scavenger enzyme activity.

Ferulic acid has a protective role for the main skin structures: keratinocytes, fibroblasts, collagen, elastin. It inhibits melanogenesis, enhances angiogenesis, and accelerates wound healing.

It is widely applied in skin care formulations as a photoprotective agent, delayer of skin photoaging processes, and brightening component.

Effects of Ferulic Acid

Antioxidant Action of Ferulic Acid

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Antiaging Activity of Ferulic Acid

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Skin Lightening Effects of Ferulic Acid

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Significance of Ferulic Acid in the Formulation

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Clinical Effects of Ferulic Acid on Skin

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.

Significance of Ferulic Acid in the Formulation

Vitamin C, or L-ascorbic acid, is the most plentiful antioxidant in human skin.

This water-soluble vitamin sequentially donates electrons, thereby neutralizing free radicals present in the aqueous compartment of the cell.

Following the donation of the first electron, a more stable ascorbate free radical is formed, and after the second electron is donated, dehydroascorbic acid remains.

Dehydroascobic acid can be enzymatically converted back to L ascorbic acid or broken down.

Vitamin C also helps regenerate the oxidative form of vitamin E, a potent lipid soluble antioxidant that is important for preventing oxidative damage in the lipid cell membrane.